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LEO Weekly: Grievances Against The Clown

Originally appeared in LEO Weekly – Sept. 4, 2015 It almost makes sense that McDonaldland and heavy metal finally amalgamated into one form, equally grotesque and beautiful. Both worlds come steeped in fantasy, replete with heroes and villains doing battle in resplendent imaginary vistas. Both ignite that child-like node in the brain that evokes unadulterated awesomeness — guitar solos are …

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LEO Weekly: An after-Forecastle look at its place in the festival circuit

I’ve retired #fedorcastle. This was a thing I did on Twitter. I’d creepshot a festival goer wearing a fedora and tweet it out with that punny hashtag. Fedoras provide good joke fodder due to their popularity and the general population’s inability to figure out how to wear one. Are you sporting a vintage three-piece suit with full-length trenchcoat for your co-workers’ …

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LEO Weekly: Colin Newman of WIRE Interview

Photo by Michael Powell Too punk for the art kids and too art for the punk kids, Wire never fit neatly into a box. Formed in London in 1976, the group released a trifecta of perfect albums – the seminal debut Pink Flag, 1978’s Chairs Missing, and the perfectly eclectic 154 the next year – before taking a sabbatical to …

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IMPOSE: Tom Scharpling Interview

Tom Scharpling understands the arduous task of quickly summarizing The Best Show for the uninitiated. He acknowledges such only a few minutes into our conversation. It spent 13 years as a slow-burning comedy show on beloved freeform station WFMU, the national beacon for unencumbered disc jockey whimsy, and thus, dominated by deeply recondite and fascinating music programming that birthed outsider …

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LEO Weekly: Does Nickelback Really Deserve the Hate?

Originally published in LEO Weekly Saying people hate Nickelback is like saying the ocean is wet. Yet, if Nickelback wears the crown as the world’s most hated band, how did they fill up well over 10,000 seats on a blistery Wednesday night in February? And why does a music writer, someone genetically predisposed against this sort of band, walk into …

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Intel: Robot teachers in the classroom

A Look at the Benefits and Challenges of Android-Powered Education It’s the first day of school in a South Korean classroom. The door swings open as children scurry to their seats. But rather than a human teacher waiting at the chalkboard, a robot greets the class. A white and yellow tower on wheels, the robot has a screen face, moveable …

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Intel: NASA turns your smartphone into a satellite

NASA turns your mobile phone into a satellite by sending it into outer space. When President Kennedy issued the moon mandate in 1961 and ignited the space race between the Soviet Union and the United States, NASA received mounting pressure to innovate comprehensively and quickly. The research and development NASA put to use in launching a vessel at escape velocity …

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The Guardian: Road trips USA, Chicago to Memphis

A diverse food scene, buzzing nightlife and great music venues (as well as record stores) make Louisville a hotspot that you can bet on … and there’s the Kentucky Derby, too Outsiders tend to equate Louisville with three famous vices: bourbon, horse racing and fried chicken. Bourbon; absolutely. Horse racing – only for those two debaucherous, weather-turbulent weeks of spring …

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Consequence of Sound’s Aux Out: The History of Hauntology

Welcome to Dreamlab. As this is the inaugural column, it seems appropriate to introduce you to the premise. A couple of weeks ago, Evan Minsker debuted his column, Trash Collector, a series that explores “music that’s immediate, doesn’t pull punches, is fast, propulsive, slack-jawed, manic, screaming, ridiculous, sludgy, lo-fi, and loud.” In that sense, Dreamlab offers the foil, examining the …